Has the eBay and Love Island partnership actually worked? – Retail Times


By Thierry Ngutegure, head of insight at Journey Further

When Love Island announced that eBay was this year’s partner, some sceptics raised their eyebrows. Previously partnering with the likes of I Saw It First, the reality show chose to ditch the fast fashion brands and partner with second-hand clothing company, eBay. But has this partnership actually worked? Have viewers headed to eBay to create their summer wardrobe? We dived into the brand health metrics and intent to purchase stats to explore if the partnership was successful.

Since this year’s series launched, eBay’s brand health has seen a steady increase, with a 8.5% increase in consideration to purchase and 145% increase in brand impression year-on-year, and 5.7% increase in consideration to purchase and 3.9% increase in brand impression week-on-week. This means the news of the collaboration drove instant conversation, positive brand impression and built a purchase driven audience towards eBay. 

However, looking at Google Trends data, there isn’t a correlation between search interest for Love Island leading into search interest for eBay. This means that although we saw an increase in positive brand impression and a consideration to purchase build during the launch, this didn’t translate into active purchaser intent for eBay.

When we look at the news sphere (using Buzzsumo, below) we can also see that there was an initial increase in media coverage around both eBay and Love Island during the launch. However, mentions and engagement of both brands in tandem have since seen a decline. 

When we isolate the mentions to focus on eBay media mentions, we see a spike around the launch but no sustained mentions of eBay (see below). This implies that there was a successful initial buzz to the partnership, particularly as this strayed from what Love Island is known for, however there was no long-term impact on customer engagement.

We can further break this down and include mention of Love Island independently where we see that since the launch, media mentions and engagements have continued to see a rise for Love Island, during the period they see a decline for eBay.

If we compare this to last year’s sponsor, Just Eat, during Love Island 2021, Just Eat’s big ATL push saw a +6.8% increase in Ad Awareness for the brand.

Just Eat also saw a +8.4% in brand impression in 2021. This measures the positive sentiment towards the brand and helps indicate whether or not they resonated with their audience – not bad at all considering this is a nat rep movement for a household brand (A a greater increase than they saw during the launch of the 2022 show)..

Finally, arguably the most important to some, there is a +9.4% in purchase intention 2021. Considering the time in which Love Island  airs and the service the brand provides, it goes hand in hand with evoking action (if sentiment is right). This increase is significantly greater than they’ve seen this year. 

It’s clear that this brand collaboration has given eBay a great and significant short-term spike across a nat rep audience, the target millennial and gen X audiences. However, outside of the initial buzz on the announcement, eBay doesn’t seem to have benefited long-term, not in the same way Love Island has benefitted by ditching the fast fashion connotations and aligning with the pre-loved movement. Perhaps in the future, a partnership with Maybe the likes of Depop would have seen a much greater audience alignment and therefore long- term brand benefit for both the brand and the reality show?





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By Thierry Ngutegure, head of insight at Journey Further When Love Island announced that eBay was this year’s partner, some sceptics raised their eyebrows. Previously partnering with the likes of I Saw It First, the reality show chose to ditch the fast fashion brands and partner with second-hand clothing company, eBay. But has this partnership actually…